Jill Weatherholt

Writing Stories of Love, Faith and Happy Endings While Enjoying the Journey

Welcome K.C. Tansley

117 Comments

kctansleyauthorpicI’m thrilled to welcome the author of The Girl Who Ignored Ghosts, K.C. Tansley. She is indeed one of the hardest working writers I know.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Kat Preston
By K.C. Tansley

In The Girl Who Ignored Ghosts, prep school junior Kat Preston accidentally time travels to 1886 Connecticut, where she must share a body with a rebellious Victorian lady, prevent a gruesome wedding night murder, disprove a deadly family curse, and find a way back to her own time.

In my novel, there are lots of things you’ll discover about Kat Preston, but here are five things that didn’t quite make it into the book. Scenes that showcased these sides of Kat ended up on the editing room floor.

1) What you see in the book: Kat’s a smart, academically driven girl. She has goals and she’s on her way to achieving them.

What didn’t make it into the book: Kat’s driven to succeed and prove herself because deep down she doesn’t feel like she was good enough to keep her father around. So she keeps trying to be better and better. To prove that she is worthy of his attention.

2) What you see in the book: Kat has lived a very unusual life for a teenager. She’s spent lots of time abroad with her archaeologist mother on digs.

What didn’t make it into the book: She very independent and even spent a summer abroad in China. She got lost near the Great Wall, but met a nice family who helped her out.

3) What you see in the book: Kat’s maternal grandparents took care of her after school when her mom was working.

What didn’t make it into the book: She loves them dearly and they are the most stable thing in her life. But she’s never told them about the ghosts. Partly because she’s afraid of the ghosts coming back, and partly because she’s afraid they won’t be able to accept what she can do. She can’t bear to lose them.

4) What you see in the book: Kat doesn’t have a lot of friends. She tends to keep to herself.

What didn’t make it into the book: Kat has trouble making friends. She’s more comfortable with books and antiques than with people. She gets on well with adults, but kids her own age aren’t easy for her to click with. Also carrying a big secret (knowing that the unbelievables exist and pretending they don’t) makes it hard to bond with people. That’s why her friendship with Morgan is really important to her.

5) What you see in the book: Kat doesn’t know what to make of Seth.

What didn’t make it into the book: He’s everything she doesn’t like, but she gets nervous around him. She can’t help being attracted to him, but she would never want to date someone like him.
Bio

K.C. Tansley lives with her warrior lapdog, Emerson, on a hill somewhere in Connecticut. She tends to believe in the unbelievables—spells, ghosts, time travel—and writes about them.

Never one to say no to a road trip, she’s climbed the Great Wall twice, hopped on the Sound of Music tour in Salzburg, and danced the night away in the dunes of Cape Hatteras. She loves the ocean and hates the sun, which makes for interesting beach days. The Girl Who Ignored Ghosts is the first book in her YA time-travel murder mystery series.

As Kourtney Heintz, she also writes award winning cross-genre fiction for adults.
Social Media
Website: http://kctansley.com
Blog: http://kourtneyheintz.wordpress.com
Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/kourtneyheintzwriter
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KourHei
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13530245.K_C_Tansley

The-Girl-Who-Ignored-Ghosts11
Buy Links:
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Girl-Ignored-Ghosts-Unbelievables-Book-ebook/dp/B00WZOJ028/ref=la_B00X369K3G_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1434139756&sr=1-1

Advertisements

Author: Jill Weatherholt

My name is Jill Weatherholt and I’m a writer. I have a full-time job, but at night and on the weekend, I pursue my passion, writing. I write modern stories about love, friendship and forgiveness. I started this blog as a way to share my journey toward publication and to create a community for other new writers. Raised in the Washington, DC area, I’ve lived in Charlotte, North Carolina since 2004. I hold a degree in Psychology from George Mason University and a Certification in Paralegal Studies from Duke University. My first book, SECOND CHANCE ROMANCE, will release in March, 2017. It's now able for pre-order on Amazon. I was the first place winner in the Dream Quest One Short Story Contest in the Winter 2014-2015 competition. In 2014, I placed second in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest. I was also a top ten finalist in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest in 2012 and 2013. I’m a 2010 and 2012 winner of the NaNoWriMo Contest. I love to connect readers, visit me at jillweatherholt.com

117 thoughts on “Welcome K.C. Tansley

  1. It seems to me that the publishers took ou some important psychological insights

    Like

  2. Sounds like an interesting read! I wish I had some teenagers around still 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a beautiful cover, K. C.! Sounds like a great story. Thanks for sharing Kat’s life with us. Kat and I have some things in common. I spent a summer in China also. 🙂 How long did it take you to write this book? What inspired you to write it?

    Jill, hope you have a great weekend! Thanks for hosting. 🙂

    Like

  4. Thank you for this interesting post, K.C. I wonder about what you cut from the novel: did you feel that these parts could be dropped because they were already well-enough expressed, or did they just add too much exposition or length to your novel? I’m always curious about what writers cut during the revision process. Did you have beta readers tell you where to cut? I imagine that being my challenge whenever I get around to editing my novels. I’m a pantser. I just write everything down and I know much of the background in my novels could probably be cut. But how to know, how to find that sweet spot of just enough background. By the way, your novel sounds like adults would like it too! Thanks again, and thank you, Jill, for hosting K.C.!

    Like

    • These were things my editor felt should be cut because they were slowing down the pacing and not necessary to the main plot. There are scenes where you get hints and the gist of Kat’s relationship with her dad.

      I do use beta readers very early in the process before I try to sell a book to a publisher, but these edits were made with my editor. Betas make suggestions, but they don’t tell me what to cut. They give me feedback and I make the final decision on what to do to address their feedback. Sometimes I cut something, many times I rework a scene.

      I took a bunch of workshops on revision with Margie Lawson–I swear by her techniques for revising.

      No one tells me what to cut except my editor. And even then if I feel strongly about keeping something, we have a discussion. Although 98% of the time she’s right. 😉

      That’s what my publisher thinks as well. 🙂 The thing is you can’t market a book and say it’s for everyone even if you think it is. So we primarily target the YA market knowing that adults read YA and there’s a lot of potential for crossover. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Great questions, Marie! Introducing K.C. and her latest release, has been a pleasure. She’s a hard worker. As for Margie Lawson, she’s an amazing teacher. Enjoy your weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Good Morning, Jill! I enjoy when you introduce us to writers. I get #4. I think this would be a fine book for an adult read… on The Porch!
    Lovely header, Jill!

    Like

  6. Thanks for introducing us to K.C., Jill. I live in CT so Kat time traveling back to 1886 Connecticut got my attention. Always appreciated reading about people’s writing process. Your flowers are so pretty! Have a great weekend.

    Like

  7. I enjoyed the details of the things that DID make it into the book backed up by the things that DID NOT. I agree with Derrick’s comment; it seems that the publisher left out some important insights. Nice to meet you, K.C., and learn about your book.
    Thank you, Jill, for this introduction.

    Like

  8. I’ve heard a lot about this book, and am glad you shared this, Jill. Hurray, Kourtney! I know it’s important to have a strong background, even if you don’t use it all. I LOVE the idea of a warrior lapdog! Thanks for sharing!

    Like

  9. Sounds like a good read. Thanks Jill for exposing us to new writers!

    Like

  10. Interesting to read the things that didn’t make it into the book. I’ll keep them in mind for when I read it. Just goes to show, there’s always more about characters than writers can put in the book. The writer needs to know everything about them, but the reader does not. 🙂

    Like

  11. Getting the right balance of backstory and character history is never easy. And even when all is done, some readers would prefer more and others, less. 🙂 I think the best we can hope for is being neither too much or too little so we don’t lose too many readers!

    But it’s really fun to see these “cuts” and take them into the reading of the story. 🙂

    Like

    • My editor was a firm proponent of if it doesn’t advance the plot or the character development, we can cut it. I love Kat’s foray to China but that detail didn’t fit nicely into a scene and slowed the pacing and wasn’t really relevant to the plot. On the upside, it gave me fodder for the blog post. 🙂 You are so right–some readers complain that there is too much character stuff in Six Train, but that’s a character driven book. 🙂

      Like

    • When I’m drawn to a character, I want to know everything about them. Unfortunately, not all readers are the same, so we must resort to the balancing act.
      I enjoyed seeing the cuts also, JM. Thanks for stopping by. Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  12. Way to edit without compromising content! I’ll pop over to the FB page and say hello!

    Like

  13. Interesting post. Thanks K.C. and Thanks to Jill.

    Like

  14. Excellent post . . . I enjoyed reading some of the back story that landed on the cutting room floor.

    Best of luck with the series.

    Like

  15. Thanks, Jill and KC. All the best.

    Like

  16. Thank you Jill for introducing us to K.C.
    K.C, thanks for sharing details of your book with us.
    My best wishes to both of you for a fabulous weekend!

    Like

  17. Very interesting post! Thank-you KC and thank-you Jill!

    Like

  18. Thank you for the intro Jill! I love that we get some fascinating insights and deeper meaning! Love it 🙂

    Like

  19. I understand loving the ocean/beach and not liking being in the sun. I believe in the Bedouin approach to sun protection, the hotter it is, the more you cover up… living in Southern California can be quite the clothing challenge!
    I am not a writer but dabbled in short stories in the past and always felt it was important to know more about the lives of my characters… so I love that you have these back stories so your characters don’t wander too far from their truth. Enjoyed this post, Jill.

    Like

    • I lived in San Diego for two years. Luckily it was very temperate in the summer. I always had a white long sleeve shirt over everything and sunscreen on anything exposed. 😉 My family laughs that I always drive around with long sleeve shirts on in the summer, but I don’t like sun. It is so bad for pale skin. A few burns as a kid and we stopped being friends. Yes, it’s essential to know about your characters than what makes it onto the page. Their actions have to flow from who they are and that requires that they be 3-D in my head. 🙂

      Like

    • I’m glad you enjoyed Kourtney’s post, Roslyn. Thanks for stopping by. Enjoy the upcoming week.

      Like

  20. Thanks so much for featuring KC this week Jill! Hi KC! I love the cover of your book, and the story sounds great. You share some fascinating insights into your character Kat while also showing how much you ended up editing out of the story. I have not – yet! – written a novel, only flash fiction and a handful of short stories, but I can see how parts of the story that don’t move the story forward need to be cut. I have such a long TBR list, but I really would like to read your book. I’m hooked, and I do love a good ghost story any day of the week 🙂

    Like

    • Hi Sherri! Aw thank you. My cover designer really got the book and my editor and publisher made sure the girl looked like Kat which made me very happy. It really surprised me how much revision and editing can happen after a publisher buys a book. But I think it made a stronger story. Flash fiction is an awesome way to learn all the elements of storytelling. If you can write short you can write long. 🙂 Aw thank you. I understand. I have 2 bookcases of books to read. I’m slowly making my way through but for every book I read, I usually end up buying 5 more! I’ve had readers say they got through it in a day if that helps. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks so much KC for your encouragement! And yes, that does help, a lot. Proves what a great story you have, that’s what I like. Something you can’t put down! You know, I didn’t realise until very recently that a publisher will go on to edit like that. That’s a good thing to bear in mind…assuming I ever get to that stage, of course 🙂 Lovely to meet you, and wishing you all the very best!

        Like

    • My pleasure, Sherri! I was thrilled to host, KC. I’ve got her book loaded on my Kindle, but like yourself, my TBR list grows each week. Have a terrific upcoming week! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Until I went through the process I had no idea how much revision can happen. It made me realize nothing is final until the book is published. It took a bit of pressure of me as I draft the next book. Because I know it’s a draft. And I want it to be a good draft, but perfection isn’t something I aim for anymore. Because someone’s going to tear it to pieces. So I am for as good as I can get it and see what happens. Thank you. Very nice to meet you too!

        Like

      • Thanks Jill, and you too 🙂 xoxo

        Like

  21. Kat sounds like my kind of gal! Fascinating character. I will definitely add this to my TBR list. Thank you for this Jill and KC!

    Like

  22. Kourtney, I enjoyed reading what the reader doesn’t know about Kat. If the author knows that much info about her, she has to be a solid and interesting character.

    Thank you, Jill, for introducing us to Kourney.

    Like

  23. Jill, this summer you had more important things up your sleeve; like writing a book! So thankful you chose to interview Kourtney. ♡:)
    Kourtney, this sounds like you filled Kat out and really know her. Kat I’d real to you with all of her habits and quirks. The relationship between her and her father sounds interesting. Thanks for coming to Hills place a nd answering a long with encouraging our eeiting. 🙂

    Like

    • I’m so thrilled Jill was able to squeeze me in on her blog. It’s such a cool place to hang out. I had a great time creating Kat and discovering who she was before the book. I think it’s really important for the author to know that even if it never gets onto the page. It still influences everything the character does and says. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kourtney, my blog is open to you anytime. Thank you for a terrific post and a great discussion. ❤

        Like

      • I use a cell phone which garbled a few words. Sorry, Kourtney!
        I think your having parts left out, you still believe these parts are in your character’s (Kat’s) background. They may surface or impact her decision making in the future. I am always thrilled to get book recommendation slips from our library snd intend to recommend this book. I do know juvenile fiction and teen historical fiction is very popular. Take care and I left you a message for your future on your own blog:)

        Like

    • Kourtney did all of the work on this post, Robin. I was thrilled to host her, as she launches her latest release. Kourtney is a wonderful writer and a great person. Thanks for reading! Enjoy your week.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. This blog tour is very exciting! Kourtney is indeed so hard-working. It’s really interesting to see the bits that didn’t quite make it into the novel – I got the sense of all of these from reading it, even without the backstory so it shows what a good editor Kourtney is 🙂

    Like

  25. Jill … Thank you for introducing Kourtney Heintz to us. Her book should be a real hit for those who love YA lit. I read some of that as well as my students. About the cuts that were made, that has to be painful. Best wishes to you.

    Like

  26. Pingback: TGWIG’s Blog Tour Continues | Kourtney Heintz's Journal

  27. I love the cover! I think it would be an intriguing story, thanks for letting us know about Kourtney Heintz, I’ll sure get a copy of her book!
    Cheers. 🙂

    Like

  28. Always fascinating to know what goes on behind the writing of a book, and judging by the number of comments this one has a lot of people hooked. 🙂 Thanks for sharing, Jill and Kourtney!

    Like

  29. I enjoy seeing what gets left out for the sake of the story — but what was essential for the writer to know for the sake of the story. Fascinating!

    Like

    • It’s very fascinating, Tracy. I was thrilled when I initially read her post. I’m always curious about the behind the scenes. Thanks for stopping by!

      Liked by 1 person

    • It’s amazing how much writers have to know but what never has to make it onto the page. Things that seemed so consequential became less so as I thought about what needed to be there for the story and not just because I wanted it there. 😉

      Like

      • I find it interesting, also, to discover what a writer doesn’t have to know. For instance, I was just reading “My Life In Middlemarch,” where Rebecca Mead muses on how little attention George Eliot pays to Dorothea Brookes childhood or her relationship to her dead parents. It’s as if she springs to life as an adult, fully formed, but without reference to the past. It works, because all of her journey of change proceeds from the present.

        Like

  30. Pingback: Five Things I Learned from My Editor by K.C. Tansley | Sheila Hurst

  31. I am amazed at the amount of guest posts I have read which have featured you Kourtney you are an inspiration.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s