Jill Weatherholt

Writing Stories of Love, Faith and Happy Endings While Enjoying the Journey

Summer Spotlight: Jenny Pellett

103 Comments

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????I’m Jenny Pellett. To be honest, I usually feel awkward taking centre stage and talking about myself. It reminds me of training courses I was sent on in my early career – you know, where you have to stand up, introduce yourself then spend the rest of the day in a team situation creating a bivouac from a single sheet of newspaper and a few cocktail sticks. I prefer to watch and observe. I write, you see. I record and jot things down that might be useful: threads of conversations, odd words (I love words), how someone is dressed; the cut of their hair; anything that amuses me. Lots of things amuse me. My cup is always at least half full and not a day goes by without something or someone making me laugh. I was brought up in a happy household; we were taught to ‘find the funny’ – the best lesson I ever learned.

I’ve always written. Fiction, articles, diaries, essays. I started blogging at Charactersfromthekitchen as a means to anchor all the characters whizzing around in my head, to give them a platform. I soon discovered that to post equals publishing, so I don’t post stories any more – I blog about all sorts- anything that comes into my head – but that’s the reason behind my blog’s misleading name. I do a lot of thinking in my kitchen – it takes my mind off the boring other stuff that has to go on there. I hate cooking.

I live in the south-east of England with my husband and son, surrounded by beautiful countryside yet only an hour from London. I’ve always lived in the country but have a hankering for the city and all its treasures. I commuted there for fifteen years, had a career in publicity and loved every minute (except the training courses). Nowadays I work in a local mainstream school as a support teacher to mainly autistic students, helping them make sense of the world. I love their point of view; find humour and wisdom in their comments and have learned to be patient as well as one step ahead.

I have synaesthesia. I see things in colour that other people don’t. Days of the week, months of the year; my number line is a like a DNA spiral strand in glorious technicolour. It never occurred to me until a couple of years ago that this was unusual but now I feel privileged to encounter these heightened sensory experiences. Something to do with the brain’s unique wiring – it’s quite exciting.

Travelling has always been a passion – back in the day, (BC – before children) we journeyed to the Far East, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka and have seen an awful lot of Europe. (Some of it literally awful…). The Americas, apart from New York City, remain unconquered. I‘m looking forward, in the next few years, to having more time to travel and to pursue some of my other interests – theatre, rambling (on foot and verbally), visiting museums, galleries and places in the UK that I’ve always meant to go.

Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow … but for now, I’d like to thank Jill for allowing me this space and crack on with answering her questions.

If you could meet anyone, living or dead, who would you meet?

Without hesitation – Grayson Perry, the eccentric cross-dressing English potter and artist extraordinaire. He has won the Turner Prize; has presented an insightful television documentary about the British class system inspired by his series of brightly woven tapestries depicting a modern Rake’s Progress; has ridden his psychedelic motor bike all around Bavaria accompanied by his boyhood Teddy Bear, Alan Measles. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy, has curated a major exhibition at the British museum and has delivered a series of entertaining talks for BBC Radio Four’s prestigious Reith Lectures slot. I saw him hold forth at the British Museum and he was inspiring. He is funny, engaging and outspoken. I like to think we’d get along like a house on fire.

If you could learn to do anything, what would it be?

A miracle, that’s what it would be. Old dogs and new tricks are words that immediately spring to mind. I think my days of learning are gone – memory like the proverbial sieve, concentration span of a gnat. What I would have liked to learn and master perfectly is the French language – I’d like to be fluent. I understand and speak it ok, but I’d love to be able to jabber on all evening intelligently to a load of French intellectuals. No idea why – it’s not as if I know any English ones. Failing that, playing the piano would be an achievement.

What do you miss most about being a kid?

The thrill of one’s birthday. Birthdays were a wonderful event: the anticipation, the treats. Arranging the party and making a guest list; the presents, wrapped and ribboned, attached to a well-wishing card; the birthday song sung at school; the embarrassment and discomfort of the bumps; not being told off; chocolate for breakfast; the cake, the candles – oh the list for what’s good about youthful birthdays is virtually endless. Nowadays I gloss over a particular annual date which, like time’s winged chariot, seems to hurtle round ever quicker.

What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever done?

Give birth. Anyone who says that you forget the pain and the unpleasant bits is lying, however wonderful your infant is. And mine was – and is – pretty wonderful actually, especially when he remembers to take the rubbish out and put his plates in the dishwasher.

Is there anything about the opposite sex you just don’t understand or comprehend?

Pretty much everything. Understanding the opposite gender is a work in progress – likely to last a lifetime. Why, for instance, don’t men like browsing? They go shopping, yes – but they go straight to what they want, buy it and head for home. No comparison shopping, no checking out alternatives – so boring.
Why can’t they ever find anything? Why do they shout from upstairs, before they’ve even opened a cupboard “where is my …………..?” Or worse: “What have you done with my …………?” And when they do open the cupboard or drawer, they just stand there waiting for whatever it is to leap out at them.
Why don’t they ever throw anything away? Why do they leave torn-open envelopes on the hall table, having retrieved the post that they need? Why are they always mislaying their wallets/car-keys/passport/tickets? Why do they panic when this happens instead of putting these items somewhere they’ll remember? Why can’t they do gift-wrapping? Appreciate your map-reading skills? Sleep without snoring or hogging the duvet?
Why do we love them?

Thanks for taking the spotlight, Jenny! ‘Finding the funny’ I love that! Up next week is Johanna Bradley.

Advertisements

Author: Jill Weatherholt

My name is Jill Weatherholt and I’m a writer. I have a full-time job, but at night and on the weekend, I pursue my passion, writing. I write modern stories about love, friendship and forgiveness. I started this blog as a way to share my journey toward publication and to create a community for other new writers. Raised in the Washington, DC area, I’ve lived in Charlotte, North Carolina since 2004. I hold a degree in Psychology from George Mason University and a Certification in Paralegal Studies from Duke University. My first book, SECOND CHANCE ROMANCE, published by Harlequin Love Inspired released on February 21, 2017 and is available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.com. I was the first place winner in the Dream Quest One Short Story Contest in the Winter 2014-2015 competition. In 2014, I placed second in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest. I was also a top ten finalist in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest in 2012 and 2013. I’m a 2010 and 2012 winner of the NaNoWriMo Contest. I love to connect readers, visit me at jillweatherholt.com

103 thoughts on “Summer Spotlight: Jenny Pellett

  1. Oh, Jenny, one of the things I’ve loved about Jill’s fantastic Spotlight series this summer has been the convergence of some of my favorite bloggers right here in one convenient location. I’ll be unplugged for the next week (leaving for vacation in Mexico in about 2 hours’ time), but I knew I wanted to read your guest post before I disconnect from the big wide world. It was such a pleasure to learn more about you. Your condition, synaesthesia, is fascinating. I’ve read about it, but I can only imagine what it must be like. I’m with you on the mystery of the opposite sex, too. If we could figure them out and publish the answers in some flashy packaging, we’d make Bill Gates look like a pauper.

    There’s a quote in John Green’s young adult novel, The Fault in Our Stars, that seems fitting here – the main character emails her favorite author and tells him, “I’d read your grocery list,” and that’s how I feel about your blog. Every post is wildly entertaining, and this one has been no exception. You manage to “find the funny” in everything. I have no doubt your family is proud.

    Like

    • Hi Gwen – hope this gets to you before you’re Mexico bound. Thanks you so much for your kind words – I’m blushing from my root to my boots! It’s been great meeting up with you – I think we’ve been interacting through our blogs almost a year now and we’ve certainly shared some humorous moments across the miles. I for one am missing your weekly posts.
      This idea of Jill’s is a wonderful way to meet up with old friends and potentially new ones – you most definitely fall into the old friends category! Have a great holiday in Mexico — see you soon back in Blogland.

      Like

  2. Nice to meet you, Jenny! I come to the spotlight uneasily myself. Your assessment of men and their refusal to browse made me laugh. And I’v e definitely heard my brother ask my sister-in-law where something was. 🙂
    I’m glad to know about your blog now that I’ve read this post! Thanks for telling us more about synaesthesia. I wondered if A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass got it right.

    Like

    • Nice to meet you too, L. Marie. Not having heard of the book you mentioned, I quickly Googled and read the lengthy synopsis. I’d say it sounds about right (especially the protagonist’s experience with her maths teacher) although I’ve never considered synaesthesia to be either an illness or a disadvantage – quite the opposite, in fact. The disability probably falls with other non-synaesthetes not believing or not wanting to understand this extraordinary condition. Many artists and musicians are known to have had it in one form or another – for instance, Kandinsky painted the colours he HEARD apparently, while David Hockney is a known synaesthete , it is rumoured that John Lennon also had the condition. Good company to be in, I’d say. 🙂

      Like

      • Hi L. Marie! I don’t want you to be uneasy coming into the spotlight…remember, we’re all friends here! 🙂
        I agree, Jenny, I wouldn’t synaesthesia to be an illness or a disadvantage. I think it only makes you extra special!

        Like

  3. Hi, Jenny! It’s a pleasure to meet you. Your love of words really shows in this post: it’s as if each word was selected carefully for its precise meaning. Yet I imagine all these words rolling off your tongue with the fluency that you wish you had for French. Well, I wish I had your fluency with the English language 🙂 And I believe you must have met my husband since you describe him so well in answering the last question 😉 I don’t have enough fingers and toes to count all the times that I have found what he had misplaced, like his sunglasses, his wallet, his keys. At least he admits he would be lost (literally) without me 🙂 Again, I truly enjoyed your post.

    And thank you to Jill for hosting. Happy Friday!

    Like

    • Pleasure to meet you too, 1WriteWay, especially as you have been so complimentary!! I do love words – where would we be without them – and aren’t we lucky that the English language has so many of them? Apparently French has far fewer words in its lexicon so there should really be no excuse for me not to learn it properly. Ah, there go, shooting myself in the foot again … 🙂
      Happy Friday and weekend to you, too 🙂

      Like

  4. Nice to meet you Jenny. I’m with you when it comes to seeing humor (“funny”) in life’s situations. I’d be nuttier than I already am if I didn’t laugh at them! I live in one of those “unconquered” parts of the U.S. and love to travel as well. Never been to your little corner of the world but would love to someday. Again, thanks for a most enjoyable post in Jill’s Spotlight. 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Mark, glad you enjoyed my ramblings. Yes, America is there to be conquered at some point. Our son went a couple of years ago and travelled quite extensively, had a whale of a time and was bowled over by the friendliness of everyone he met. What are we waiting for? Time, mainly … oh, and a pocketful of dollars! 🙂

      Like

  5. My husband is a definite browser. That man can give new meaning to the words ‘shop til you drop’. Me, I can browse, but I’m more of a go get what I came for type of shopper. Nice interview, Jenny. It’s a great pleasure to meet you. 🙂

    Like

    • Nice to meet you too, Elizabeth. Your husband is surely unusual when it comes to shopping but I guess it’s good that you are the go get one when you’re at the mall – otherwise you’d never get home!

      Like

  6. Hi Jenny! Although I blundered through, Center Stage is not my first choice either. Your remarking about this makes me want you to give me your address and birthday date and I will send you a special package wrapped with lots and lots of lace and ribbons! I enjoyed reading your biography so much; like you said about me, I feel I know you better. I keep smelling Chanel No. 5! LIke your love of it, what comes through Jill’s Spotlight is your wonderfulness and spark. I envy your happy childhood and searching for “the funny.” You would be a joy to be around. We met by way of WordPress because we both have synaesthesia. I did not know John Lennon had it. But I do know that Kandinsky’s paintings do sound like music. I bring my synaesthesia to this, perhaps! Happy
    red day for you! And have a nice bluish purple Sunday. (I forget what color your Saturday is.) In kelly green, H x

    Like

    • Sadly my Saturday is a muddy grey/brown. Go figure that one! And Sunday is pink. I don’t know where I read about John Lennon – so it might just be imagined.
      I wonder what it would be like to hear colours. I know someone who associates smells with certain words. It’s such a diverse condition. We had a TV programme recently which reckoned that all babies have synaesthesia but most grow out of it as their brains mature. They didn’t go on to explain that as adults we don’t have immature brains which I thought was a bit insulting!
      So pleased we connected over the blog world – and lovely to find a fellow synaesthete.

      Like

      • I think our brains are just fine. Sometime tell me, who diagnosed you with synaesthesia? I found out about it in Time Magazine. And when I look at certain paintings, the abstract expressionists primarily, I hear sound.

        Like

      • Hi Hollis! I hope you’re having a great weekend. Somehow I completely forgot you were gifted with synaesthesia as well. I definitely wasn’t aware that that is how you and Jenny connect…cool!

        Like

  7. ‘Man Looking’ is the disability term you seek, Jenny, for being unable to find anything 🙂 Men expect a world of order and do not compute if things aren’t as they ought to be. I enjoyed your reveals and look forward as ever to your future blogs.

    Like

    • Ah, so that’s what it is. Thanks Roy, that explains everything! Thanks also for sticking with my ramblings, it’s always great to exchange comments with you on our blogs.

      Like

      • Hi Roy! I agree men do expect order, but it’s been my experience that women have better organizational skills than men. Of course, you’re probably the exception and very organized. 🙂

        Like

  8. Hi Jenny 🙂 Lovely to meet you!
    I’ve never heard of synaesthesia but thankfully it doesn’t sound painful, just colourful. How did you discover you had the condition?
    We have travel in common. It’s the love of my life 🙂

    Note to Jill, if you’ll excuse me, Jenny?
    Did you see my reference to deadlines the other day, Jill? By what date do you need my email to comfortably give you time to post?

    Like

    • Hi Jo! I sent you an email. 🙂

      Like

    • Hi there Jo. Lovely to meet you too – I’ve been checking out your Monday walks!
      I found out about my own synaesthesia during a staff meeting when a pupil was being discussed. They thought he was odd, I thought he sounded normal. He saw his numbers as sparkles coming at him in 3D and was struggling with maths. He’d mentioned this to his teacher who had just laughed. I was appalled. I had trouble with maths all my life because if my numbers don’t “blend” colour wise then I don’t see why the sum should work. I know it sounds weird, but I could so understand that pupil’s problem!

      Like

  9. Wonderful to meet you Jenny 🙂 Loved your answers and I think we have a lot in common. I share a shelter with three members of the opposite sex. I am allowed to cohabit with them because I am a gatherer and they are (apparently) hunters. The brochure said that is the way it has been for thousands of years. I suspect I was duped into this arrangement because I find I am the one having to point out the location of potential food sources while gathering up after them. Sometimes when I watch cooking shows I can smell the frying onions/scallops and garlic and have even tasted these phantom meals – don’t know if that is synaesthesia? probably not. I suspect I’m just always hungry.

    Like

    • Sounds like that brochure needs updating. Lovely to meet you too, Yolanda – am I detecting a healthy amount of cynicism there? 🙂 I find much of my gathering takes place on our stairs. I often put items that need to go to someone’s room at the foot of the stairs in the vain hope that one of them might pick it up and take it there – but no – with such long legs and wide strides they are perfectly capable of stepping straight over any obstacle in their way.
      I’ll be calling in on you later on 😉

      Like

  10. Thanks for claiming center stage, Jenny. Great to learn about you and your non-browsing husband. 😎

    Like

  11. Well hello dear Jenny, lovely pal of mine! How wonderful to see you shining beneath Jill’s Summer Spotlight. Oh you certainly do find the funny and I love all the laughs we’ve had since meeting up here in blogland (but don’t worry, I won’t mention Mrs Robinson or pink hotpants if you don’t).
    Reading again here your introduction reminds me of last summer (goodness, a year ago!) when we met over ‘spamgate’ and I discovered that you worked with autistic children and of course have synaesthesia. The rest, as they say is history 😉 Oh dear, I’ve gone all reminiscent now…!!!
    Love all your answers to Jill’s questions, and I’m with you on giving birth…but we won’t go there. I laughed out loud at your ‘concentration span of a gnat’.
    Oh I do love reading you…your writing is so witty and descriptive and beautifully eloquent.
    I’m fascinated by the way you take notes of all that is going on around you. I observe but so often forget to write things down, and then of course they’re gone…poof! How much fun it would be to people-watch with you 🙂
    So far as men are concerned, it always cracks me up how they will open a cupboard looking for something, not move a thing and then wonder why they can’t find what they’re looking for. Usually, said item is staring them right in the face. I would be a rich woman if I had a dollar for every time I’ve said, “If it were a snake it would have bitten you already”.
    Thoroughly enjoyed this post Jenny – so glad we met here, you brighten blogland for all your blogging friends in so many ways.
    Thanks again to you too Jill, for another excellent Summer Spotlight!
    Wishing both you lovely ladies a wonderful weekend 🙂 xx

    Like

    • Hi Sherri. As usual you have taken time to read and leave a lengthy comment. You are a very kind and generous blogger! I’m full of admiration with all the writing you do and how you still have time to read and respond to so many of us. I am looking forward (as I know Jill is) to reading your memoir.
      In the year since we met through our WordPress problems we have become true cyber friends – our lives seem to have so many parallels while being so different yet the co-incidences keep presenting themselves. And no, please don’t mention the hot pants.
      So there you are – next time you feel a coffee shop moment coming on, take a note book. It’s fascinating eavesdropping on conversations that you never hear the conclusion to – puts the imagination into overdrive. Maybe we should start the Coffee Shop Challenge? Now there’s a thought.
      Enjoy your (hopefully sunny) weekend. 

      Like

      • Hi Sherri! It’s always nice to see your smiling face. I hope you’re having a wonderful weekend! Have you been working on your memoir? I hope so!
        Wasn’t Jenny great in the spotlight? I think she’s like me and doesn’t enjoy being the center of attention. I’m happy she jumped on board though.
        Enjoy the rest of your weekend! xo

        Like

      • Thanks so much Jenny, that’s really kind of you…and yes, why not? I really like the sound of a Coffee Shop Challenge! Who knows what great stories/memories triggered could come out it? 😉

        Like

      • Hi Jill, and yes, you can be assured that I am stepping up the memoir writing even more now!! And yes, loved reading Jenny’s post, so glad she took part! Had a lovely weekend thanks, very hot here, but cooler now again and in for some rain. Love that summer rain! Hope you did too and here’s to a good week ahead for us all 🙂 xo

        Like

      • Hi Sherri! I’m thrilled to hear you’re stepping up the memoir writing! Have a fantastic week!

        Like

  12. I enjoyed my stroll over at your site, Jenny – great pictures! I was especially impressed with the Women of World War II memorial – and the observation regarding the oblivious passing woman! Having an autistic nephew and knowing first-hand the challenges and blessings that go with that world, I applaud the work you do – it really does take a special sort, a special spirit, to do it well. It’s a pleasure to make your acquaintance!

    Like

    • Hi Shel! Jenny is a talented photographer. She has some great tours on her blog, it makes you feel as though you’ve taken a trip.
      Enjoy the weekend!

      Like

    • And yours, Shel – thanks for your kind words about my site, it was nice of you to drop by and take a look.
      There are certainly challenges that go with having an autistic child – but there is also great joy and humour too. The literal way they look at life can be a lesson for us all – it has definitely made me look at situations from different view points.

      Like

  13. I have always thought it must be a wonderful condition to have – synaethesia – and there you are saying it IS EXCITING! How fantastic is that! My mind and memory works in boring pedantic black and white and there is absolutely no excitement in that. I;m just the teeniest bit envious! I so enjoyed your writing and answers to the questions – especially that amazing sounding man you would like to meet [whom I have never heard of, so I’m off to google him immediately] Very nice to meet you Jenny, when I’ve finished with your man I ‘ll pop over to your blog for a visit. Pauline

    Like

    • Hi Pauline – I’d love to hear your thoughts on dear Grayson. I know he’s not everyone’s cup of tea but there’s just something that’s so endearing about him. And thanks for stopping over in my kitchen – I’ll respond to that one very soon. Lovely to meet you 🙂

      Like

      • Hi Pauline! I agree, it does sound exciting. Like you, my mind is kind of boring in black and white. 🙂
        Enjoy the rest of the weekend…hugs to my favorite pooch, Siddy!

        Like

      • I watched a couple of interviews with him on You Tube and read a ‘pop’ bio. What an interesting man! I just love what he is doing with his pots – it’s like mixed media art only on clay instead of canvas. I found that most inspiring! I admire anyone who has the courage to be who they are and society be damned 🙂 I found his tapestry work featuring his alter egos – the bear and the woman, getting married really touching – there he is acting out what we must all do at a soul level to become whole and healthy individuals. I’m pleased you mentioned him – I have let my global art interest slip in recent years, this is a good re-introduction.

        Like

      • Ooh goody, another convert! Thanks for your feedback – I’m so glad you liked him ( I know he’s not everyone’s cup of tea!)

        Like

  14. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    JENNEY—-SAAAAALLLLUTE! 🙂

    Like

  15. Am I the only one who didn’t feel the least bit awkward talking about himself here? I imagine that is not an endearing quality of mine. If I were a halfway decent human, I’d have been embarrassed by the attention!

    Well, Jenny, whether it makes you blush or not, I enjoyed reading about you and your life and your interests. This summer series not only spotlights individual bloggers, it also shows that no two people are the same. I think of all the interesting folks here and then consider how many interesting people I must pass by every day without ever realizing all the great things they have to offer. So thanks for opening up the cupboards for a few minutes.

    i can answer your question about why men can never find anything: Because we make up our minds what we are looking for ahead of time, and if the actual thing does not resemble the prepared mental image, we will look right past it as if it’s not there. Luckily, we can usually pick up heavy stuff, so I guess we’re worth keeping around for that.

    🙂

    Like

    • Hi there Eric. Your rationale for not finding anything is very similar to Roy’s, above, so I guess there must be a thread of truth in it. Thanks for taking the time out to read through my spotlight, however gauche it makes me feel it’s always lovely to meet new people. 🙂

      Like

      • Eric, no one will accuse you of being shy. Obviously you’re comfortable in your skin, that’s just how you roll. We wouldn’t want you to change. 🙂
        Lifting heavy things and grilling definitely makes you guys keepers. Enjoy your weekend!

        Like

  16. I love your take on men, Jenny. My hubby turns the radio down when he’s trying to find a car park (I think because he finds it hard to focus on two things at once) 😉

    It’s lovely meet you and a big thanks to Jill for this great spotlight! 😀

    Like

    • Haha, I love that! Actually, I have to confess to turning off the radio when I’m concentrating in the car but then I’m probably writing a mental shopping list at the same time anyway. Or doing the ironing. Something like that …
      Lovely to meet you too Dianne – thanks for joining in my spotlight. 🙂

      Like

  17. Jenny, I thought I knew you so well; how did I miss your gift for color synaesthesia? And it is a gift…wow! That’s an intriguing character quality in a story, and it’s one you could write personally. I agree with you about how hard it was giving birth–Molly was posterior–but it’s strange that as soon as I held her in my arms I knew it was worth it.
    I loved this, Jenny!!!

    Like

    • Ah thanks, Marylin. I think we are all getting to know each other fairly well – just about a year now, isn’t it? It’s always such a pleasure to read your weekly post – I pick up so much wisdom from your writings, you’ve taught me – and I’m sure many others – so many things. And how much common ground we share is just amazing, given the miles of land and ocean that separate us! Have a good weekend, see you soon in blogland, of course! 🙂

      Like

    • Hi Marylin! Jenny did a fantastic job, didn’t she? I could almost hear her accent as I read her answers to my questions.
      Happy Weekend!

      Like

  18. What a terrific idea, Jill. You’re having a party over here!

    It’s interesting–I loved reading this post. Especially because it’s not a post that Jenny would ever put on her blog. I find it fascinating, how our relationships intertwine, and bring out aspects of ourselves and one another, that we would never see if we weren’t all connected.

    That’s getting philosophically deep, isn’t it? I’d better quit, before I use the word juxtaposition. 😉

    Like

    • I’m having a fabulous time here Tracy, meeting all these new people and catching up with old friends.
      I think we should set ourselves a challenge with this juxtaposition word. See how often we can get it into a blog post or comment without sounding pretentious. It’s one of my pet hates – we could have a lot of fun with this!

      Like

      • We have so much in common, Jenny — so often thinking alike. I’m wondering how much of a juxtaposition our pronunciation of our similar thoughts would be, if we were talking instead of writing.

        Count me in on the challenge!

        Like

      • Let’s go for it! I’m one up already!!

        Like

      • Hi Tracy! I hope you’re enjoying your weekend and feeling good!
        That is exactly the reason I wanted to do this spotlight series, I wanted people to reveal more about themselves. So many of us run in the same blogging circles. I feel like we know one another, but I was greedy and wanted to know more. 🙂 I’m thrilled and we’re not even half way through the scheduled spotlights. I’d love to add your name to the list…hint hint. 🙂
        Happy Weekend!

        Like

  19. Hi Jenny, I love the synesthesia that you have. I was first introduced to the concept as a literary term, and it was immediately my favorite one. When i discovered that it’s an actual condition I was even more excited–so much the better! I do see numbers in certain colors, but my seeing of the colors is so mild that it’s probably just a version of what everyone sees. It’s not particularly noticeable, if that makes sense. I wish I had it even more! How do you find it informing your writing? Is it ever a detriment to your writing?

    Like

    • Hi there Luanne – I think you probably do have it mildly – most people don’t see their numbers in colour at all. Do your numbers repeat, as in 2, 22, etc? There’s an online test you can do somewhere, you could Google it- I can’t remember the site- but it’s how I determined that I do have colour synaesthesia. I don’t think it affects my writing either way. For years I never even thought it was extraordinary, I never thought to mention it to anyone because I assumed everyone experienced the same thing. It’s good that we’re all different, after all, don’t you think?!

      Like

      • Hi Luanne! I hope you’re having a fantastic weekend! I think you’re right Jenny, Luanne might have a mild case. My numbers are never in color, but it would be interesting to take the test.

        Like

  20. Hi Jenny, what a wonderful read…funny, enlightening and insightful! I’m fascinated by your condition – what an absolutely brilliant thing that would be to have. Can I borrow it for a week? lol As or the whole man/woman thing…what fun would it be if we “really” understood each other! I have a background in Special Education, both personally and professionally, as well. I’ll have to pop over to your blog and get to know you a little better. All the best. ~Karen~
    Jill, I nominated you for the Most Influential Blogger Award! Your summer series is just one of the reasons as to why I think you are so deserving of this award! Congratulations! Refer to my site for info. 🙂

    Like

    • Hi Karen – lovely to meet you. I’m not sure you could borrow it but you could try thinking about your days of the week as a colour, see if that works! Today for me is pink – I have no idea why, but the idea of Sunday has always been pink. Tomorrow is sky blue and Tuesday is yellow with browny edges, like toast. It’s not the word itself, it’s the idea of the day, if that makes any sense at all!
      Looking forward to getting to know you better too — thanks for stopping by on Jill’s spotlight series and commenting.

      Like

  21. You always bring the funny to my blog world Jenny – your description of Grayson Perry could describe you – funny, engaging and outspoken, so I’m sure you would get on like a house on fire.

    Like

  22. Really enjoyable to learn a bit more about Jenny. Look for the funny – indeed. Wise words. Loving this series, Jill.

    Like

  23. Thanks Francis, I’ve recently started following your blog and am finding many wise moments there – I’m looking forward to many more. Thanks for stopping by here 🙂

    Like

  24. Birthdays used to be such a thrill. I still try to take the day for myself. Not as much fan fair but just a day of me doing what I want. 🙂

    Like

  25. This was such a treasure of an interview and I liked your answers to the questions about pain and learning best, Jenny! Jill, you really know how to ‘pick ’em!!’ Smiles, Robin

    Like

  26. Well, Jill – this has been a blast! Such fun meeting all your regulars – thank you very much for the invitation – I’ve had a lovely time!

    Like

  27. I can so identify with you, Jenny. I thought all of my French had leaked away…until I started trying to learn Italian. Now it acts like a bully, pushing the Italian out of my head and showing up as if I were once fluent — which I never, ever was, nor am likely to be. Concentration of a gnat…for sure! Good to meet you.

    Like

  28. Nice to meet you, Jenny! You had me cracking up so much throughout your post and particularly when you touched on those aliens named, men! Ha,ha! You got it right on.

    The other day I was perplexed (as usual) when my husband decided to have a load of manure delivered to our driveway the day before my daughter’s high school graduation and before my mother was to come in to town to stay with us. You did WHAT? The pile of sh** was enjoyed by the many guests and relatives who came to the graduation party. He said he wanted to use it as compost for our garden that he didn’t get a chance to grow. 🙂

    Great post! 🙂

    Like

  29. Oh, this was a fun read! Thanks for the chuckles, Jenny. Nice to meet you!

    Like

  30. Wonderful meeting you. Like you, I don’t like being the center of attention and I admire your openness. I recently heard of synaesthesia and now I know a bit more about it.

    Like

  31. Great to meet you Jenny. I loved reading about you and your answers to Jill’s questions. You are indeed a very special person. This is the first time I heard of synaesthesia. I share a passion of yours and that is learning french. I am trying hard but somehow finding it difficult. Thanks for being part of Jill’s awesome series of spotlight. Take care and God bless.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s