Jill Weatherholt

Writing Stories of Love, Faith and Happy Endings While Enjoying the Journey

Warm Memories

94 Comments

Image courtesy of Wikipedia.org

Image courtesy of Wikipedia.org

“Memory is the diary that we all carry about with us.” ~ Oscar Wilde

Many of you have had your fill of snow this winter. Dealing with snow as an adult isn’t as exciting as when I was a kid. Commuting to work in dangerous conditions and walking on icy sidewalks is not my idea of fun.

Snow days during childhood ignite some of my best memories. The excitement of a potential storm had me popping out of bed all night. I would peek through the blinds hoping to see flakes flying by the light of the street lamp.

Too often, the storm would miss the D.C. area. My sister would come into my room and announce, “Get up, we got jipped again.” We would head off to school tired and cranky. Thankfully, my mother always made sure we did our homework, just in case.

Once in a while, the storm arrived as predicted. I would turn on my clock radio and anxiously await the announcement that Fairfax County Schools were closed for the day. Rather than go back to sleep, I sprung from my bed, full of energy. For some reason, 6:30 a.m. on a snow day never felt early.

As my sister and I ate breakfast and waited for daylight, my mother placed our winter coats, hats and gloves, on top of the heat register, located on the kitchen floor. When it was time to go outside, our outerwear was always toasty warm.

After several hours of sledding, making snowmen and snowball fights, we were wet, cold and ready to come inside. My mom put our wet clothes into the dryer and served up grilled cheese sandwiches and chicken noodle soup. For dessert there were homemade brownies and Jello.

I was never sure if my mother enjoyed those snow days as much as me and my sister. We certainly created a lot of extra work for her on those days, but she always had a smile, so maybe she did.

What is your fondest childhood memory?

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Author: Jill Weatherholt

My name is Jill Weatherholt and I’m a writer. I have a full-time job, but at night and on the weekend, I pursue my passion, writing. I write modern stories about love, friendship and forgiveness. I started this blog as a way to share my journey toward publication and to create a community for other new writers. Raised in the Washington, DC area, I’ve lived in Charlotte, North Carolina since 2004. I hold a degree in Psychology from George Mason University and a Certification in Paralegal Studies from Duke University. My first book, SECOND CHANCE ROMANCE, will release in March, 2017. It's now able for pre-order on Amazon. I was the first place winner in the Dream Quest One Short Story Contest in the Winter 2014-2015 competition. In 2014, I placed second in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest. I was also a top ten finalist in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest in 2012 and 2013. I’m a 2010 and 2012 winner of the NaNoWriMo Contest. I love to connect readers, visit me at jillweatherholt.com

94 thoughts on “Warm Memories

  1. Oh, I remember looking out the window, trying to see if it had snowed/was snowing. But we lived in the country, so no street lights. I learned that if you shined a flashlight at just the right angle, you could see the snow falling!
    and there’s no food I like better than a grilled cheese sandwich….to this day!

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    • Aw, you were very resourceful, Dianna. If there was snow in the forecast, I never slept. Even today, I can still feel that sense of disappointment when I would look out the window and the streets were dry.
      Oh yes, a grilled cheese sandwich, definitely the ultimate comfort food. I like mine with lots of Cayenne Pepper. πŸ™‚
      Have a wonderful weekend! I can’t wait to hear about your road trip to meet your blogging bud.

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  2. I am beginning to think that all children have this same thought process inherently present within them from birth πŸ˜‰ Your words so accurately describe my experience as a child growing up in Pennsylvania. The way that snow can sneak up on you without a sound and deposit a foot of its frozen delight on the ground overnight seem to provide more anticipation on certain days than Christmas morning πŸ˜‰ Wonderful recollection of your experiences, thank you for sharing and best wishes for an inspired day.

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    • Thank you, Dave. Growing up in Pennsylvania, I’m sure you saw much more snow than we did in D.C. I don’t recall ever having a white Christmas. I do remember that often, the forecasters overhyped the storm, I suppose it was because we didn’t really get hit too often.
      I appreciate you stopping by and taking the time to comment, Dave. I hope you have a great weekend!

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  3. Your snow day memories remind me so much of mine, Jill. I also yearned for school to be canceled, so that I could go out and play in the snow. And my mom made grilled cheese sandwiches and tomato soup.  My brothers and I built what we hoped was an igloo in the front yard one winter. And of course we built snowman after snowman. Only Mom wouldn’t let us put a carrot in the snowman’s nose.

    I remember being six and having to wear one of those awful snowsuits that make kids look like starfish. I also had rubber boots and mittens clipped to the end of my snowsuit. I was so glad when I outgrew it and didn’t have to wear it again!

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    • We are sisters from another mother, Linda. πŸ™‚ I’m curious why your mom didn’t let you use a carrot…she probably didn’t want to waste food, my mom was like that.
      Lol…I can picture you in that snowsuit, I remember the mittens clipped on the end of the sleeves. You’re right, the suit did make kids look like a starfish. I never had one, I suppose it was because we really didn’t get a lot of measurable snow.
      Have a great weekend! I hope you’re getting some warmer weather.

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      • We are, and you’re so right. Mom didn’t like the thought of us wasting food on a snowman. She also grew very tired of us trying to save snow by sticking in the freezer. Perhaps she knew that my older brother would try to stick snow down my back or our younger brother’s back one day. πŸ™‚
        We did get warmer weather. The temperature was about fifty degrees the other day! I ran outside in a T-shirt!

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      • Nice! That makes me happy you were able to get outside in a T-shirt today, Linda. We hit 75 today, it was beautiful, but fleeting…colder weather in the forecast for Tuesday. It’s another roller coaster ride. πŸ™‚

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  4. My memory of school cancellations is the same as yours. Up early, out the door as soon as possible and back in late all wet, tired and hungry. I especially remember the heavy coats I wore — wool Melton with scarves and mittens. If I fell over someone had to help me back up. Winter clothes are so much lighter and better these days. Oh yes, the snowball battles where you cheered when you triumphed and cried when you failed. (Tears worked better for girls.)

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    • If I could have gone outside while it was still dark, I would have. If you grew up in PA, I’m sure you experienced a lot more snow than I did, Kate.
      Falling over and not being able to get up on your own, you must have had the starfish snowsuit that Linda referred to.
      I remember those brutal snowball fights. Once I got hit square in the face with an ice ball, there was no snow on that ball…I cried, for real. πŸ™‚
      Happy Weekend, Kate!

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  5. “…winter coats, hats and gloves on the heat register…” what a nice touch!

    I only experienced snow when I was 5, 6, 7 years old living up North. Then we moved South when it snowed, really snowed maybe once every few years. But I do remember my first cold weather lunch at Michigan State — yes, I left the sunny South to go to school in the northern midwest — I remember having my first reuben sandwich and bowl of vegetable soup! Yummy and so warm. There I learned to never serve just a sandwich or just a bowl of soup for lunch during cold weather, but both, soup ‘n sandwich.

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    • Yes, my mother thought of everything. πŸ™‚
      Well. it sounds as though that tuition money paid off, Georgette. A sandwich without soup during those cold winter months is just wrong.
      Enjoy your weekend!

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  6. What great memories, Jill! The fact that your mom would warm up your coats, hats and gloves is so awesome! I have to admit (as much as I hate to) that I had fun in the snow when we moved to MA. Except for the time I had to walk home from school and we had about 3 feet of snow and trekking through the snow took forever which led to my “accident” in my snow suit before I could reach my house. But, other than that, it was fun!
    I have great memories of my mom rubbing our faces and eye lids to help us fall asleep. She had so much patience and love to give! πŸ™‚

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    • Hi Maria! I hope you’re having a great Friday night. I might break out those heel and tambourine very soon. πŸ™‚
      Yes, my mother was/is pretty awesome. She thinks of everything.
      You poor thing, walking home in 3 feet of snow…didn’t the schools close early to avoid such situations?
      Maybe that’s what I need, your mom rubbing my eye lids at night, I don’t sleep that well. Your mother sounds a lot like mine. πŸ™‚
      Enjoy your weekend, Maria!

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  7. Don’t know about fondest but I do remember walking with my Dad in very thick snow around our village. It had drifted so high that at one point we had to follow the top of the roadside hedge so that we wouldn’t sink into it. I must have been about five. Dad also made our sledge which we used on the farmer’s field just a little way from the back of our garden. It was a whole village event, as were a lot of things in those days.

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    • Well, I was curious about any fond childhood memory, not just trudging through the snow. πŸ™‚ I’m sure that’s a nice memoy of you and your father, despite the mounds of snow. I’ve never experienced such high snow drifts, like you described, sounds rough. That’s nice that the snow brought the village together. I wonder if it’s still that way.
      I hope you have a great weekend, Jenny!

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  8. what lovely memories Jill πŸ™‚ I grew up in Africa so no snow in my childhood except for one freaky June day in 1981. The snow started falling while we were at school so the teachers (you should have seen their faces) not knowing what else to do sent us all home. We didn’t possess things like gloves and snow boots and winter coats but that didn’t stop us from building snowmen and rolling around in the wet snow until my mother got home. That was my first ever “snow day”. Now of course I get a few of those here in Vancouver but snow is still something of a novelty.

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  9. I don’t remember why or what it was, but I remember an old, lack, unworking car parked in the little strip of land connecting the driveway to the back yard. Whenever we got a decent amount of snow, I’d use it as a stunt car… jumping sliding across the hood like an action hero, running up and over and then wiping out off the trunk (on purpose). The snow made a nice stand-in for safety mats.

    My favorite memories of childhood usually include a trip to the bookstore or getting a horror magazine in the mail. Loved sitting on the front porch in the sun and reading about Dracula and gang.

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    • I can picture you using that car for your stunts, Eric. I’m sure you perfected the jump and roll move. That was the great thing about snow, it made for a soft landing.
      I’m with you, many of my great childhood memories involved a trip to the local bookstore. I never read Dracula and gang, but I do remember purchasing Stuart Little and The Boxcar Kids.
      Have a great weekend, Eric!

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  10. Love your snow day memories! I never saw snow til I was 21! My fondest childhood memories are of beaches and shell hunting and saltwater taffy, and lots of sunshine.

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    • Aw, those are great memories, Dor. I’m definitely a beach person and I would choose shell hunting over snowball making any day. Living in the Shenandoah Valley, you have the best of both worlds. You’re not too far from the ocean.
      Enjoy your weekend, Dor!

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  11. Sounds like a happy childhood and a happy home, Jill. πŸ™‚

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  12. Oh Jill, I did enjoy reading about your snow memories! You reminded me of some of my happier times as a young girl, playing in the snow just as you describe and then coming back inside to mum’s homemade soup! We had to walk home in the snow once, my brother and I, when the bus didn’t show up. We grew up in the countryside and so we trudged through open fields up to our knees in the snow and never thought twice about it! Great fun! My own children never had a ‘snow day’ until we moved back to England. I’ll never forget the first time they saw falling snow outside their own windows. I don’t think I’ve ever seen such excited kids! Jill, you make me feel so cosy and warm and good inside. I say this because I’m house-sitting for my son and girlfriend while they are in sunny California and their boiler has broken so I don’t have any hot water or heating!!! The gas man came to fix it today and had the wrong part!!! I tell you, life really is stranger than fiction…and darn right frustrating!
    Have a great weekend my lovely snow-friend and may your spring arrive very soon… πŸ™‚ xoxoxo

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    • Oh Sherri, I am so sorry! What are the odds of the broiler break while you are house-sitting…and the gas man brought the wrong part! You’re right, life is stranger than fiction and often more frustrating! I’m sorry you have to deal with this.
      I love your memory of your children seeing snow for the first time. You’ll never forget that.
      Hang in there. I hope the gas man fixes your issues soon, Sherri. Stay warm! xoxoxo

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      • Thanks Jill! It’s Tuesday and still no boiler – the latest is that it will be Thursday now! Thank goodness I brought my little electric fan heater with me and nothing beats a hot water bottle! What gets me too is it’s gone really cold and wet here, but it’s supposed to be warming up by the weekend! Lately I feel that it’s one thing after another but it’s the way it goes sometimes isn’t it? Anyway, I hope you’re having a good week and the sun has come out to play for you at long last πŸ™‚ xoxoxox

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      • I hope the broiler is fixed soon, Sherri. Funny, you’ve got your hot water bottle and I’m sitting here with a heating pad…it’s freezing here too!
        Our sun was short lived. We had a cold rain today and tonight a hard freeze.
        Like you, they’re predicting a warm for us as well this weekend, in the meantime, I’m snuggle with my heating pad and you with your hot water bottle…oh, we’re quite the pair. πŸ™‚

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  13. Snow days are actually big memories for me because they were very rare where I grew up. We could always count on one day out of the year though, usually around Christmas when there would be enough to stick to the ground for awhile. The neighborhood kids would have the usual snowball fights and snowman building… good times.

    Hope all is well with you Jill. Have a great weekend!

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    • If you grew up where you currently reside, I’m sure snow days were few and far between, Phillip. Nice, you had snow on the ground around Christmas. In my 40 years of living in the D.C. area, I don’t recall a white Christmas.
      I hope everything is okay with the wee one, Phillip. Enjoy your weekend!

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  14. What a warm and lovely story, Jill. With us it was tomato soup and grilled cheese, with gingerbread and hot cocoa for the second round. We were never content to only go out to play in the fluffy stuff just once. One of my favorite memories (I have SO many) is the first time I ever saw snow. I was six years old and thought it the most magical stuff ever. πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Elizabeth. Well, my mother didn’t make the traditional tomato soup and grilled cheese since she knew I didn’t like tomato soup. Gingerbread with hot cocoa sounds delicious!
      I like that you remember the first time you saw snow, I don’t remember that first time. I wish I had started journaling earlier. πŸ™‚
      Happy Weekend!

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  15. I still eat grilled cheese sandwiches as comfort food! With tomato soup. A great winter lunch or supper.
    Chicken noodle soup is for colds.
    Thanks for the comfort post!
    Theresa

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    • Grilled cheese is the greatest comfort food! I drove my mother crazy being a picky eater. I didn’t like tomato soup, but I loved chicken noodle whether or not I had a cold. πŸ™‚
      Enjoy your weekend, Theresa!

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  16. I used to pray on my hands and knees for Snow Days :). And I’d hold my breath while they listed the school closings.

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  17. In used to love when we had a blackout – sounds strange but the house would go quiet (well, as quiet as possible with six children) and we would tell stories by candlelight. When the lights came back on the magic would be over and we’d all head back to the tv or our rooms πŸ˜€

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  18. As a kid, my favorite lunch on a snow day was cheese grits, poached eggs and bacon. SOOO good after we’d played in the snow and shoveled off the walks and thrown snowballs at each other.
    As a teacher married to a teacher, we listened to the radio and when the school district finally closed, we slept in for another hour. Then we went out to breakfast to a favorite place in Manitou Springs that has “snow-day specials” with amazing choices for the hearty customers who made it through the deep snow and ice patches to come for breakfast. We had a 4-runner that could get anywhere as long as other cars didn’t slide in to us, and Snow Days were our favorite days!

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    • Perfect, you always had a date on snow days…nice! I love the idea of the “snow-day specials” for those customers who braved the elements, they deserved a hearty breakfast.
      Enjoy your weekend, Marylin!

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  19. Jill, I read your blog post Friday morning, then went off to work in what became a lovely 60-degree day. Snow days were the last thing on my mind. It was wonderful to be outside supervising recess in the sunshine and warm air. Kids kept asking if they could take off their jackets! This time of year is tricky though, because winter’s not quite ready to leave and spring can’t make up its mind. Either way, by the last week of March even we Chicagoans can assume the worst of it is behind us. But we’re looking at dormant, brown grass, soggy yards with a lot of mud, and the occasional hard, dirty lump of snow that hasn’t yet melted all the way. Not pretty, but it’s better than winter. And next Friday we leave for California, where the weather is the same almost every day of the year. Can’t wait.

    I know it sounds strange, but some of my favorite childhood memories were the crazy parties my parents used to throw. My mom and dad got married (way, way) too young, so they did a lot of their growing up at the same time they were raising kids. Weekends they’d host parties with friends, neighbors, lots of loud music, food, beer, and other things that I’ll leave to your imagination πŸ˜‰ Even though they’d put us kids to bed, we found it hard to sleep with all the action going on. So we’d entertain ourselves by creeping down the stairs in our nightgowns to spy on what everyone was doing. If someone saw us peeking around the corner, we’d race back upstairs, wait a few minutes, then sneak back down and watch until we were discovered again. Our favorites were the themed parties, like Halloween or St. Pat’s, or disco. Once they even had a toga party just for the heck of it. To this day, there are certain bands and record albums that I associate with that time of my life, because we listened to them again and again. Pretty much any song by the Moody Blues, Van Halen, the Bee Gees, or The Alan Parsons Project takes me right back to that tiny bungalow on the west side of Cleveland.

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    • Hang in there, Gwen, before you know it, Chicago will be sweltering. I’m happy you had a little taste of spring. We enjoyed it as well on Friday, and also today, with temperatures around 75. It’s lovely, but short lived with rain/sleet in the forecast for Tuesday. That’s March, it’s a time of change and a time when you have no idea what to wear to work. 😦
      I loved the memories you shared of your parents parties. I remember you mentioned how the Moody Blues brings back a lot of memories. My parents had parties too, no togas or disco, but like you, I remember sneaking down the stairs with my sister, to spy and laugh. I loved to watch the outfits the women wore…in the 70’s it was long skirts with teased hair.
      Enjoy your California escape, Gwen! After the winter you’ve endured, it is well deserved. πŸ™‚

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  20. At quite a young age I, and other boys of my age, used to be gone from the house for long periods. Sometimes the whole day. We used to get up to all sorts, whatever the weather, and without a penny in our pockets. No means of communicating where we were either. And at least once I got lost and ended up miles from home. You’d eventually be driven home by hunger and Mum would hardly notice we’d been gone.
    This was common. These days parents are condemned for turning their backs on a young child for five minutes. Yet I don’t recall anything bad ever happening to any of us. Sure you’d meet the occasional weirdo but you thought nothing of it.

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    • I agree, Roy, there has always been weirdoes. I remember a boy in our neighborhood, he was a couple years older, he would try and lure younger kids up to his parents attic. My mom said he was a β€œweirdo” so we should stay away from him, so we did.
      Like you, during the summer months, my sister and I would head out to play and be gone for hours, usually until we got hungry. There were no cell phones to track our location, we were just kids doing what kids do best, playing.
      I suppose we live in a different time. I think we grew up during a great time, Roy.
      Enjoy your weekend!

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  21. My memory suggests that we used to get more snow than we do these days – I remember sliding along the street on the way to school. I think my best childhood memories are of that freedom just to roam and make up games as we went along.

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    • That’s interesting, Andrea, I was just thinking the opposite the other day. I grew up in the D.C. area and I don’t remember having a lot of snow days. I have friends with children who still live in D.C and this winter they’ve had an unbelievable number of snow days.
      I agree, the freedom to roam as a child was great. I don’t think I ever wore a watch. πŸ™‚

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  22. What beautiful memories, Jill. No snow where I grew up…rain and sunshine. School was never canceled because of rain. We used to enjoy playing in the puddles on the way to school.

    I saw snow for the first time in the year 2000. I was in Canada. I’d like to build a snowman one day.πŸ˜„

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    • Oh, splashing in puddles, that was fun, wasn’t it? I do remember schools being closed once for rain. There was terrible flooding and many of the local roads were closed.
      I hope you get to build that snowman, Elaine! πŸ™‚

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  23. This was a wonderful memory that evoked a lot of memories of snow days in my mind. I appreciated the way you built the post, including such lovely and fond details! I always loved snow days, usually that meant my Mom who taught in another district, would be off, too! She liked to have the double reason for the snow day, seeing us and not having to head to work! I liked being out for hours, spending fun times with my brothers and neighbors. We always had a warm lunch too, waiting for us, inside! I would come in before my brothers, getting colder sooner. I miss those care-free days, but am blessed with such lovely memories. Thanks for this, Jill!

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    • Thanks, Robin. πŸ™‚ Oh yes, your mother must have really loved snow days, a day off and spending time with her children. Like you, I didn’t last as long outside as my sisters and our neighbors usually did, but it was fun while it lasted. We are blessed to have such wonderful memories. Enjoy your week, Robin!

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      • Enjoy your week, too, Jill! I took a day off and feel like I am running behind, as always on reading. I had to check out your other comments and enjoyed everyone’s menus. You had a lot of great responses, here! I also remembered that if we were lucky, we would help make cookies after lunch! Yummy! Smiles, Robin

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      • Thanks, Robin! I’m glad you took a day off, but I understand the feeling of running behind.
        I agree, the comments are great. I love learning more about everyone and reading about their memories.
        Ah yes, making homemade cookies, what a sweet memory. Enjoy the rest of your week, Robin. πŸ™‚

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  24. I love remembering the seasons of the my childhood. Your post (as your posts often do) evoked a lot of childhood memories of snow days, which I probably had the advantage of since I lived further north than you πŸ˜‰ Unfortunately I didn’t have a sibling close enough in age to play with so I spent most of my snow days curled up with a book. But at least I didn’t have to wait in the dark for the school bus πŸ™‚

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    • Curled up with a book on a snow day sounds pretty nice, Marie! I loved being off from school, but I’ve never enjoyed the cold, so being cold and wet, was only fun for brief periods of time. I never lasted as long outside as the other kids. My favorite part was the lunch and dessert, and being dry. πŸ™‚ Have a great week, Marie!

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  25. Raised in Michigan, our regular trips to New Bedford, MA (where my parents were raised) were lived for. It’s where I could enjoy ocean, triple decker houses, cousins, and Sunday mornings at St. Joseph’s followed by english muffins and coffee frappes (if I forgot and called them ‘milk shakes’ there was no ice cream). Decades later, NB is the setting for a fiction project I’m working on.

    Oh yeah, and penuche.

    But I also loved the Michigan snow days – I’m with the others who enjoyed (and enjoy) curling up with a good book on a cold day!

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    • What a great memory, your trips to New Bedford. I love that your current fiction piece is set in a location where you have such wonderful memories, Shel.
      These days, snow days are few and far between in Charlotte, NC, but I’m with you, curling up with a good book is the best!

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  26. I am a little embarrassed to admit it, but I actually still got out of bed to peek outside and check for snow…
    One of my fondest childhood memories, and it’s snow-related, is coming home cold and tired from an afternoon of tobogganing, and seeing our house in the winter twilight, a warm orange-colored light glowing in the front window.

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  27. β€œGet up, we got jipped again.” Love that language (may have to use it for one of my next characters!). You have my mouth watering for noodle soup and grilled cheese sandwiches – how delicious. It’s the opposite here as my kids prey for days over 40 degrees as the school air-conditioning tends to pack in and they are all sent home! I remember wishing for the same snowy days growing up in England though x

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  28. What lovely memories, Jill. You mom sounds so sweet. I like snow days too, only because they are so rare here in Charlotte.

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    • Thanks, Rajni…my mother made my childhood extra special and as an adult, she is my best friend. πŸ™‚
      Oh yes, snow days are very rare here in Charlotte…everything turns to rain.
      Have a great week!

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  29. Believe it or not, you’re making me feel nostalgic for the snow again! πŸ™‚ I grew up in Michigan so snow days, sledding, making snowmen or snow forts, and then coming in for hot chocolate are some of my fondest memories too – probably because we would get so much snow there. During those few months when it wasn’t snowing, tree or roof climbing and reading were favorites.

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    • I’ve always been impressed by states, like Michigan that have so much snow each winter, but everyone continues to go about their business, going to work and school. Your comment explains it all, β€œduring those few months when it wasn’t snowing.” Here in the south, a little snow or ice, shuts everything down.
      Roof climbing…interesting. πŸ™‚

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  30. We had certain foods relegated to snow days as well. My mother had a way of celebrating everything with food – even making snow cream out of the snow. Wow. Nicely nostalgic!!

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    • I’m happy you have such wonderful memories of your mother, Renee. No doubt, she was a very special lady.
      I’ve never heard of snow cream…sounds interesting. πŸ™‚
      My sister and I would pour soda over glasses of snow and make slushies.

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  31. In winter, of course, there was always the eager anticipation of that first snow that “stuck” and the temperatures were just so that the ponds, where we’d skate and play hockey until it was too dark to see, froze over. Oh, how I loved those times when the ice was thick enough for us–as good as the ice the Fort Wayne Komets skated on! Later in the evening, after one of Mom’s warming meals, I’d lie on my bed and listen to WOWO radio’s broadcast of my hockey heroes, skating and playing, while I imagined myself right out there on the ice with them!

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    • What great memories, Mark, thank you for sharing. Well, it sounds as though you are a dire hard hockey fan. I enjoy watching hockey, it so much more exciting than baseball.
      I’m truly sorry about the loss of your friend, Mark. I know it’s a difficult time for you, so I appreciate you taking the time to comment.

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  32. Long summer days spent at my grandparent’s farm.

    I do wish, however, that we hadn’t burnt the barn down (that story is in the book!)

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  33. I definitely remember getting gypped by snowstorms as well (I grew up back East, although I’m in northern CA now) — when the snow was thick, but not enough to warrant cancelling school, I would need to drive to high school in a monstrous van that my brother and I got to haul around music equipment. The van was not exactly a rugged offroad-style vehicle and was impossible to stop in the snow, so I would need to drive at about 2 MPH in those conditions. Okay, maybe that wasn’t my fondest memory of childhood.

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    • Ha ha…yeah, that doesn’t sound like a fond memory, but it was memorable. I would think the weight of the music equipment would give the van a little bit better traction. I would be fish-tailing if I were driving. I don’t think I would have the patience to drive 2 mph, Chris. πŸ™‚

      On Tue, Mar 25, 2014 at 10:47 PM, Jill Weatherholt wrote:

      >

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  34. Having grown up in southern California, I never experienced anything as fun as snow storms and and snow days. No, pretty much the only thing exciting that happened was the occasional earth quake πŸ™‚ I have so many fond memories (I suppose the video I posted recently kind of summarizes that thought). One thing I thought of as I was reading your post and once again becoming nostalgic (I do that a lot these days) was the wonderful feeling I get thinking back on the long summer breaks, where the sun would shine and my friends and I would get on our bikes and head out and be gone all day. Seriously, all day, not returning until dinner time. And the next day, we’d do the same all over again. Of course those long summers always seemed too short when the first day of school arrived πŸ™‚

    Ahh … sweet memories.

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    • Oh Dave, I too have the same memories. The endless days of summer when you left the house on your bike and returned home just as the sun was setting. The day passed so quickly and there was never a time where we said, “I’m bored” like you here so often today. Those are the sweetest memories. Thank you for sharing yours.

      On Wed, Mar 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM, Jill Weatherholt wrote:

      >

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  35. I grew up in California. We never had snow days or the hope for snow days. I was always jealous. then in high school I moved to Colorado. It has to snow a lot for the schools to close there, so I think we had one snow day in three years. Now that I live in London (don’t hate me for saying this, I know this winter has been hard) I miss snow. It’s only snowed four times in three years.

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    • Ha ha! Well, I won’t hate you because we haven’t had to deal with too much snow this winter, but some of the other commenters might feel differently when they read your comment. πŸ™‚ Maybe I should move to London, snow 4x in 3 years sounds pretty good to me.

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  36. I hate snow as an adult–black ice on roads and driveways and sidewalks scare the heck out of me. But as a kid, man those snow days were awesome. My cousins and I were usually left with Grandma H and would play in the snow and build our own snow tunnels and bad igloos. πŸ™‚

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