Jill Weatherholt

Writing Stories of Love, Faith and Happy Endings While Enjoying the Journey

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire

102 Comments

fire
Was that smoke I smelled?
My mind told me it was.
The sirens grew louder.
They’re headed to our house.

I kicked the twisted sheets off my small legs, sprinted down the hall and into my parent’s bed room. With a flying leap, I was safe between my mom and dad.

As a child, I was frightened by the sound of sirens in the middle of the night. I tried to drown the sound by burying my head underneath my pillow, but it never quieted my fear. I was sure the fire engines were coming to our house.

This fear wasn’t grounded in anything realistic. We never had a house fire, neither had our neighbors, but the fear persisted.

My parents didn’t get angry or dismiss my fear as silly, when I charged into their room. They understood my fear was real and provided me with comfort and love. Once the sirens passed, I felt safe returning to my own bed.

As silly as it sounds, even now, when I hear sirens in the middle of the night, fear sets in. I picture a burning house or a terrible car accident. I guess some fears we never outgrow.

Do you have a childhood fear that has lingered?

Advertisements

Author: Jill Weatherholt

My name is Jill Weatherholt and I’m a writer. I have a full-time job, but at night and on the weekend, I pursue my passion, writing. I write modern stories about love, friendship and forgiveness. I started this blog as a way to share my journey toward publication and to create a community for other new writers. Raised in the Washington, DC area, I’ve lived in Charlotte, North Carolina since 2004. I hold a degree in Psychology from George Mason University and a Certification in Paralegal Studies from Duke University. My first book, SECOND CHANCE ROMANCE, will release in March, 2017. It's now able for pre-order on Amazon. I was the first place winner in the Dream Quest One Short Story Contest in the Winter 2014-2015 competition. In 2014, I placed second in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest. I was also a top ten finalist in Southern Writers Magazine Short Story Contest in 2012 and 2013. I’m a 2010 and 2012 winner of the NaNoWriMo Contest. I love to connect readers, visit me at jillweatherholt.com

102 thoughts on “Where there’s smoke, there’s fire

  1. What an interesting question, Jill. I find my recurrent dreams are more about my adult anxieties than my childhood ones, but in thinking about them, I’m sure all fears are grounded in childhood. So are our coping skills for managing them; your parents were so wise to give you comfort instead of dismissing your fears.

    Like

    • I agree, Candace, most of my fears stem from childhood experiences. Ah, those adult anxiety dreams…I could write a book on those. 🙂
      Great testimonial on your blog today! You’re a true professional.
      Have a great weekend!

      Like

  2. No childhood fears except for the alligator under my bed. I lived in Pennsylvania and there are no alligators so I have no idea where that came from. I was a young adult when my mother was ill. She was frequently hospitalized. For the most part I drove her there but there were a few occasions where the ambulance took her in. Every time I heard the sirens, tears would well up in my eyes no matter where I was or who they were picking up. Strangely enough, when she died that reaction to sirens stopped.

    Like

  3. Your parents handled that situation so beautifully. Your wonderful vivid imagination is probably what conjured up that fear when you heard the wail of the fire trucks and the memory lingers. Great post!

    Like

    • Thanks, Dor! Yes, my parents were great when it came to my fears. Thunderstorms were another thing that sent me running into their room. Perhaps I’m the reason they never had anymore children after me…too many interruptions. 🙂
      Happy Weekend!

      Like

  4. Your fear resonates with me. There’s something about sirens that still cause my heart to race and my body to freeze. I didn’t hear them often when I was a kid, but there was a frightening incident when a barn about a block away from my home went up in flames. We could see the red glow from an upstairs window. I’m sure there were sirens. We had a local volunteer fire department, but our town was so small, they wouldn’t have had far to go. The piercing wail of sirens has always haunted me, but as a child I think it was just the sound, like a person lonely and in distress. As an adult, I had an accident that required emergency personnel. So now the wailing sirens seem personal 😉
    Great post, Jill. You have a way of helping me unearth memories that had been long forgotten 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you for your kind words, Marie. I hope I didn’t stir up memories that you’d rather forget. I can picture you, as a child, watching out the window.
      I had a similar experience a couple of years ago, when the clubhouse in our neighborhood burned to the ground, on the 4th of July. It was like a dream.
      That’s an excellent description of the sirens, they are haunting, especially at night.
      Enjoy your weekend, Marie!

      Like

  5. Ugh! Sirens in the middle of the night freak me out! Any loud noises in the dead of night set my heart to racing. So I totally hear you. I’m glad your parents comforted you instead of sending you back to bed unheard.
    I remember the fear of something popping out of my closet. I’d shut the door tightly, hoping that whatever was in there wouldn’t come out. I still prefer a closed closet door nowadays.

    Like

    • You’re right, Linda, any loud noise in the middle of the night is freaky.
      Funny, I always checked my closet too and I never slept with the door opened. Even as an adult, I’ll never forget after watching the movie, The Silence of the Lambs, I came back to my house and checked all of the closets. 🙂
      Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  6. Wow, very scary, Jill! Hmm. I had a lot of fears as a kid. For one thing, my parents kept my bed about one foot out from the wall, so I was sure there were monsters teeming down there, just waiting for me to accidentally hang my arm or leg over that side of the bed! I still have certain phobias–claustrophobia, for one. But that was caused by a series of incidents. I can’t think of any childhood fears that have lingered. I think once I gained more control over my life (as an adult) most of them went away.

    Like

  7. Great question Jill! After my younger sister said she saw a ‘prowler’ in our backyard one night we both developed a fear of being taken by the bogeyman 🙂 Unfortunately this fear was made real one night for us both, when my mother went out with her friends after we had gone to sleep and forgot to mention there was a babysitter in the sitting room. Being light sleepers, we woke up to the sound of someone moving about in the house and well, you can imagine the rest – we were petrified! I don’t think I have known fear like that since.

    Like

    • Wow, what a story, Yolanda! I can’t imagine the fear you and your sister felt that night. Hopefully after that, your mother let you know when there was a babysitter in the house.
      Have a great weekend and thanks for sharing your story.

      Like

  8. I still have what I think is a healthy fear of dentists. 🙂 But other than that, I tend to dream occasionally about losing loved ones. Those are the ones that really scare me. Of course I wake up and all is well, but man, those always seem to be so vivid!

    Hope you have a great weekend Jill and can enjoy your flood-free writing space. 🙂

    Like

    • A ‘healthy fear’ of dentists, I like that. I dream some weird stuff, but fortunately I’ve never had a dream about losing a loved one. That would be very frightening for me too.
      Thanks, I have been enjoying the flood-free space. 🙂
      I hope you have a nice weekend. My thought and prayers remain with you and your wife, Phillip.

      Like

  9. How cute is that, running to the safety of your parents. Glad they did not dismiss your fears. Whenever I’m out of the house and I hear sirens I swear they are headed to my house and I can’t help worrying.

    As for childhood fears? Hmmm….I didn’t have any recurring fears but I remember this one time when I was young and sleeping over my cousin’s house. It was the middle of the night and I woke up to the sounds of screams coming from outside. They were the howls of a woman who I was told was crazy and was wondering around the house. My uncle came into the room to check up on us and he was holding a gun. He told us to stay put and that he was going outside to check things out. OMG. I can still feel the terror I felt. My entire body was shaking uncontrollably and I could not get back to sleep. I couldn’t get the sounds of the woman’s shrieks out of my mind. My uncle had called the police and she was not found. Fortunately, nothing has triggered those memories since!

    Like

    • Wow, Maria, what a scary experience! I wonder what happened to her…was she a neighbor of your cousin? Gosh, that story gave me the willies!
      I hope you have a great weekend. Maybe springing forward will bring some nicer weather to your area. I’m ready to feel some sunshine. xo

      Like

  10. Nicely written, Jill. I think my childhood fears, which linger still, are subtle. They seem to stem from the anxiety and uncertainty that my mom’s family experienced during the war. Somehow that got passed on to me with worries about school, career, success, and relationships–a subtle, yet nagging feeling that even if things are going well today, they can all fall apart tomorrow. I think my mom gave off this vibe that everything and everyone you love and cherish can be taken away in an instant. It’s hard to live that way, but I hope to overcome it somewhat by exploring my mom’s past.

    Like

  11. Fears are interesting little habits we acquire aren’t they! Your blog-friend Ian has written a spot on comment! As someone who grew up filled and over-flowing with fears both real and imagined I know how invidious they can be. I learned to deal with my fears by questioning their reality. Is that true? Has that happened to me? Is it likely to happen again, is it happening now? I learnt to ‘feel the fear, but do it anyway’ you know, carry on despite rather than give in to it. Over time most have disappeared. Those that remain are simply told ‘Right now, all is well’.

    Reading your experience though is one of those mysterious little windows in life. If the fear was not exacerbated by those around you and it appeared so strongly at such a young age – where did it come from? There is a mystery story there Jill 🙂 And it was beautifully written!

    Like

    • Thank you, Pauline! 🙂
      You’re right, questioning our fears is a great way to come to terms with their reality. ‘Right now, all is well’ is a terrific response to those fears that still linger.
      I agree with you and Ian’s comment. I would recommend checking out his blog, it’s very moving, as he reveals his mother’s past.
      I hope you have a wonderful weekend. I’m still dreaming about your latest creation, Pauline…it is beautiful!

      Like

  12. Jill,
    How wise your parents were not to mock your fears!
    I was always afraid of spiders, and still am. I’m better than I used to be, but the big ones still make me cringe. Funny how I can tell from across the room whether a bug has six or eight legs. It’s only the eight-legged varieties that bother me.
    Theresa

    Like

    • I agree. I don’t think I would have gone back to sleep so easily had my parents immediately sent me back to my room.
      Ugh! I’m with you, Theresa, spiders scare me too, but not as much as snakes.
      I’m impressed you can tell a six legged spider from an eight legged one, from across the room, no less. 🙂
      Have a wonderful weekend!

      Like

  13. I recall being scared of tornadoes when I was a kid, which is odd since I live int he northeast, which is not exactly twister-central.

    Like

  14. Like Theresa, I had a fear of spiders, and I haven’t outgrown it. I’m creeped out by most bugs, but spiders were always the worst. I could spot a brown spider on a brown door from down the block (that is only a slight exaggeration.)

    Since moving to Florida, it’s hard to say what flips me out more: palmetto bugs or spiders. Happily, there have been very few of the latter in my house here, but the former is another story (and I’ve written several!) Suffice to say when one is spotted in the house, even after my knight in shining armor (hubby) has eradicated it and removed the remains, it will be weeks before I am comfortable in a dark house…

    Like

    • Ugh! Palmetto bugs definitely freak me out more than spiders. They can be huge! I lived in Florida for a brief period of time, you’ve got your share of bugs, Natine.
      It’s nice to have that knight in shining armor to deal with the creepy crawlies, isn’t it? 🙂
      Lovee your post today! Happy Weekend!

      Like

  15. Jill – I always had the fear that my parents were going to run away. I have no idea why this started – we were and are a very close knit family. They did go out quite a bit to see various friends when I was a child (I am the eldest of three) and we were always left in the more than capable hands of Nanna, my maternal grandmother. I would reassure myself that they were coming back by checking to see if their toothbrushes were still in the bathroom.

    Like

    • Oh Jenny, that would be a terrible fear to live with as a child. I wonder if you ever shared that fear with your parents. I did have to laugh at how you reassured yourself…that’s cute.
      Have a great weekend and congratulations to your son on the completion of his book!

      Like

      • I told Mum recently. She was horrified! It’s funny what we live with, isn’t it. I’ve just remembered that our son had a fear of the house burning down when he was small and that was triggered by a safety lesson at school. It took a long time for him to put things in perspective.

        Like

  16. Hearing sirens reminds us that somewhere, someone is in trouble. Maybe it’s compassion. Funny, for me it seems I’m more afraid of things as an adult than when I was a child. It was childhood innocence back then. Now, with all the scary news pumped at us 24/7, it gets scary. Thanks for sharing a piece of yourself. Nice to meet you through Kourtney.

    Like

    • That’s a great point, Lori, I would definitely describe myself as compassionate, perhaps that is where my fear is coming from.
      How true, the 24/7 news these days, can frightened even the bravest person. I remember the days when the news was only on TV from 6:00-7:00 pm, and then again at 11:00 p.m.
      Thank you for stopping by and taking the time to comment. Kourtney’s great, isn’t she? Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  17. This post reminds me of my daughter, Fiona, who has an almost pathological fear of fire. It grew out of the fire safety program, “Learn Not to Burn,” which our school district presents to all third graders. The program was meant to educate students, but it ended up scaring the crap out of her. Even if a pot on the stove begins to boil over, she panics. We try to do as your parents did – comfort and assure her that everything’s fine and she’s safe. I hope that in time, she’ll be able to put it all in perspective.

    Like

    • Oh Gwen, I feel for Fiona. I can see how the fire safety program, although meant for good, could create such fear for a child. I get fearful around the holidays with Christmas tree lights. I’m obsessive about making sure things are unplugged and candles are extinguished.
      I hope you have a great weekend, along with some warmer temperatures, Gwen. xo

      Like

  18. Jill, my husband still has fears of house fires. When he was a young boy, the furnace in his family’s home malfunctioned and Jim, his sister and their parents awoke to a house filling with smoke. Neighbors had called the fire department, and Jim’s dad wet towels in the bathroom and covered his family with them, led them downstairs and out the front door. All was well and safely resolved.
    Like Gwen said, we “Learn Not to Burn.” As with all fears, we try to learn lessons that will help us survive.

    Like

    • How frightening that must have been for your husband, Marylin. Thank heaven his father knew how to respond in such an emergency. I often wonder whether or not I could react calmly in a situation like that and remember what to do.
      Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  19. I had a terror of nuclear war when I was young – it was at a time when the government were broadcasting adverts about what to do in a 4 minute warning – we even had to do drama at primary school about being in a shelter in the aftermath of the bomb – it’s no wonder I was terrified! I also went through a period of nightmares about triffids after watching the Day of the Triffids TV series 🙂

    Like

    • Wow, I can see why you were terrified of nuclear war, Andrea. I remember having a similar fear after watching the movie, The Day After. Reading, The Road, many years later, didn’t help either.
      I hope you’re having a great weekend!

      Like

  20. Mine still lingers, sweet Jill! xo

    Like

  21. I was too stupid as a child to fear anything. My mother worried a lot about me because I wasn’t afraid of anything. But I did feel some fear when I was caught in dangerous situations. Now I have plenty of fears to make up for what I lacked back then. And I too absolutely hate to hear sirens in the night. I love this little story and the love and support given by your parents. A child couldn’t ask for anything more.

    Like

    • Thanks, Elizabeth. You’re right, I couldn’t have asked for anything more then and now…I am blessed with wonderful parents.
      I love that you were a brave child…if we were friends at that time, I would have been envious. I have always been a big chicken. 🙂
      Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  22. I have always been afraid of enclosed spaces. Never outgrew it. I wonder if your fear is grounded in a real memory from very early on, before you consciously can remember it. I once was very adventurous–according to my parents–until my brother shut me inside an underground (dry) well. I don’t remember it, but boy how I hate feeling claustrophobic. LOL

    Like

    • Oh my, what a frightening experience, Jolyse. I’m glad you don’t remember the experience. I wonder if your brother remembers.
      I’m like you, very claustrophobic. It’s funny because I blame it on my sister. When we were little, she told me there was some candy in the bottom of my sleeping bag. I crawled head first to retrieve the candy and she zipped me up! Weren’t we lucky to have such loving siblings. 🙂
      I hope you and your family are doing well, Jolyse.
      Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  23. I still am afraid of the dark. But it’s more the pitch black where I can’t see anything. I just need a smidge of light to sleep. 🙂

    Like

  24. That’s great to hear that your parents acknowledged why you were afraid and comforted you, rather than saying “that has nothing to do with us — now go to bed,” or some kind of irate response like that. Fire engine sirens are constantly going off in my neighborhood, and I do find myself sometimes wondering if I live in the world’s arson capital.

    Like

  25. Biggest childhood fear (that I can remember) was extending my feet to the bottom of the bed – I was just sure something horrible lurked in that dark area where the bedding got tighter. I’m past that now. My grown-up version is I can’t sleep too close to a wall – the thought of touching it while I sleep is . . . indescribably unpleasant to me. And to this day a wash of sadness comes over me when I hear the wail of a train horn.

    You’re going to need an office with a couch if you keep tossing out these memory-provoking question, Jill!

    Like

    • Ha ha…I suppose that’s why I majored in Psychology in college, I’ve always loved getting into people’s minds.
      Oh wow, I get the same feeling as you when I hear a train whistle. It is such a sad and lonely sound. Unfortunately we have some tracks close enough to our house, that I hear it in the distance.
      Have a great week, Shel!

      Like

      • I was representing a man that was the epitome of a biker dude some years back. Right after the judge pronounced him ‘divorced’ the long wail of the train sounded from a few blocks away. We walked somberly out of the courtroom and I said to him: “Wow – what a fitting sound to go with the Judge’s words.” He said: “The only thing that could have been more appropriate was the sound of a toilet flushing.”

        A few years later I heard about a Florida judge that actually played a recording of a toilet flushing after he granted each divorce. Apparently his superiors found it less appropriate and/or amusing then he did – he got sanctioned.

        Like

      • What a great story, Shel, thanks for sharing! I sometimes forget how comical the world of domestic law can be…at times.

        Like

      • That’s interesting that you two find a train whistle mournful. I find it comforting, having grown up in a very quiet rural area where I could hear the train whistle a few miles away from our home. I live in a suburban area now, but am happy the train is still within hearing distance (Miles away though. It doesn’t shake our house). 🙂

        Like

      • Something about that sound just makes me feel sad, Jolyse. I’m not sure where it comes from. I’m happy to know you can still hear the train, without pictures falling off your walls. 🙂

        Like

  26. I jump when I hear a siren because we live in the middle of a country area and never get them here – when I go to the city the sound of sirens wakes me in the night so I totally understand how you feel.

    As far as childhood fears go – I still fear horror stories because my older brothers and sisters always told them and I’d be scared in the night 😦

    Like

    • I can see why you would jump when you hear a siren, Dianne. Hopefully you don’t hear them too often.
      Like you, I’ve never been big on horror stories. When I moved out on my own, I had to stop reading Stephen King. 🙂
      Have a great week!

      Like

  27. Oh, those distant sirens! I have to agree with you on this one. The sound has always triggered a very worrisome feeling for me. I suppose it is because it means someone is very hurt–or worse!

    Like

    • The sound does trigger a lot of emotions, Mark. I sleep with a sound machine now, so it drowns out any outside noises. 🙂
      Have a great week! Looking forward to the release of your latest book.

      Like

  28. A little uncomfortable for me, this one, Jill. I was involved in a house fire as a baby and although I have no proper recollection I am horrified of fire.

    Like

  29. Before I was born, my parents lost a house to fire. They lost everything as it was winter and a deep snow kept the fire trucks from being able to get there in time to even save their porch furniture or cat. It started from a fireplace and when they rebuilt, they wouldn’t include one in the new house. To this day, I can still hear the way my mother spoke of combing through the ashes, crying, picking up pieces of her life and throwing them in a dump truck. Sad. I suppose that lingered. We installed gas logs in all of our fireplaces.

    Like

    • Oh Renee, what a horrible experience for your parents. I know people always say, at least we got out alive, but I can’t imagine how painful it would be to lose those special photographs and keepsakes.
      I appreciate you sharing this story, Renee. I hope your knee is continuing to feel better. Enjoy your week!

      Like

  30. Good topic to address fears that linger, Jill.
    I have an intense fear of dogs. When I was a child, I was almost bitten by a dog. Sometimes I wonder if the dog had bitten me if I will still be this fearful. My children tell me I need therapy and I believe I do.

    I am glad your parents did not dismiss your fears. They gave you the comfort that you needed.

    Like

    • Thanks, Elaine. My parents always seemed to know the best way to handle situations. I was/am very blessed.
      I can certainly understand your fear of dogs, if you were almost bitten as child. That had to have been very frightening. Perhaps therapy could help, if you truly want to get past the fear. I’m not always comfortable around big dogs, especially if they aren’t properly trained. Good luck if you decide to conquer your fear. I have a few other fears I should conquer myself. 🙂
      Enjoy your week!

      Like

  31. Oh yes. Fear of water. I’ve not had anything traumatic happen to me but I have always been afraid of water– my family had a house right on the beach and my brother’s would tell me about how a tidal wave would knock the place down and drag it miles into the ocean… I could never sleep, I had to stare at the lights out on the ocean to make sure they didn’t go out because a wave was building. I’ve still never learned to swim!

    Like

    • Wow, no wonder you couldn’t sleep and never learned to swim, Aussa. It’s amazing the power that words contain. I wonder if your brothers realize they are the reason or at least part of the reason, you’re afraid of water.
      My mother never learned to swim either. We grew up with a swimming pool in our backyard and I always got nervous when she would cleaned the pool or float on a raft.
      Have a great week!

      Like

  32. Hi Jill, the wailing of sirens fills me with anxiety too.

    I fear so many things, probably everything that’s mentioned above and then some, but most of all I’m afraid of relationships falling apart.

    I wish it were easy to overcome our fears.

    Like

    • Hi Rajni! I hope you’re enjoying our beautiful weather. I’ve been heading out to the park every chance I get. 🙂
      Interesting, you fear relationships falling apart. I think when I was little, and my friends parents were divorcing, I feared that for my parents too, but other than that, I’ve never really thought about it.
      Like you, I have many fears that I wish were easy to overcome. Riding an escalator is a fear I wish I could overcome.
      Have a great week, Rajni!

      Like

      • Yes I am enjoying the lovely weather. I walked to my daughter’s school to pick her up in the afternoon. We collected wild flowers and pine cones on the way back. It’s going to be gorgeous all week so looking forward to more walking.

        Maybe fear serves a benevolent purpose or we would all be running with the bulls in Pamplona. Have a wonderful week.

        Like

      • Ha ha…good point, Ranji! Those people seem to have no fear. I’m glad you and your daughter have been able to enjoy the nice weather. Unfortunately, from what I heard on the local news, it’s coming to an end tomorrow, but the nice weather will be back. 🙂

        On Mon, Mar 10, 2014 at 11:10 PM, Jill Weatherholt wrote:

        >

        Like

  33. I really loved this post Jill because I can just imagine you as that little girl leaping into your mom and dad’s bed, frightened by the sound of the siren wailing in the distance yet feeling immediately so safe and warm snuggled in between your parents who were always there to quiet your fears and not be cross with you for waking them up. That is the true love of parents for their child and it made me feel really cosy and happy because it reminds me of my happier childhood days when my mum and dad were still together.

    You write in such a way that I could clearly see this scenario in my own mind and it conjured up powerful memories of a sound I used to be scared of. I remember late summer afternoons of being outside in our back garden and a sound would drone in the distance which always scared me. It was probably some kind of hedge trimmer but it always frightened me thinking it was coming after me and my family. I loved it when we were all safely back inside as the sun began to lower in the sky and I no longer heard the spooky, low hum of the scary monster lurking in the woods as I imagined!

    Jill, thank you so much for your wonderful support these past couple of days especially, I can’t express enough what it has meant to me. I hope that you and Derek from Devon had a wonderful weekend and I look forward to catching up in the week 🙂 xoxo

    Like

    • You are so welcome, Sherri. I’m happy you had a nice weekend with son Nicky, celebrating your husband’s birthday. Happy birthday to hubby! Sometimes I think we need to step away from our computers and enjoy life. You did just what the doctor ordered.
      Thank you for sharing your childhood memory. There were no limits to our imagination, when we were children. Like you, sounds could be a trigger to make my imagination go wild. Next time I hear the sound of a hedge trimmer, I’ll think of you. 🙂
      As for my parents, then and now…they are the greatest. 🙂
      Derek from Devon sends his love, as do I. Enjoy your week! xo

      Like

      • Ahh, thanks Jill, and Hubby says thank you very much 🙂

        Your parents sound absolutely wonderful, what a very great blessing in your life, I feel so happy about that because I can ‘see’ their love in you…

        Much love to you and DfD and wishing you both a great week ahead too.. 🙂 xo

        Like

      • Thanks, Sherri! xo

        On Mon, Mar 10, 2014 at 7:57 PM, Jill Weatherholt wrote:

        >

        Like

  34. Apologies for the late response, Jill – I’ve been away from the Internet for a heavenly few days!! This is a touching post. I am terrified of flying, which is ironic considering I’ve spent most of my life towing back and forth between England and Australia. As a child I’d endure take off cemented into the back of my seat with a magazine over my head. I’ve just returned from a flight to Queensland and my chest is still a tight, jittery knot – it will take days to unravel again. The fear goes hand in hand with a fear of heights. Pathetic I know. I’ve even considered hypnotism! It will never stop me flying though because my love for travel is stronger – luckily x

    Like

    • No apologies necessary, Gemma…I’m jealous! An internet vacation does sound heavenly. 🙂
      Like you, I have a fear of heights, but I’ve never had a fear of flying. I have been known to have sweaty palms during take offs and landings. I don’t think it’s pathetic, I give you credit for not allowing your fear to keep you from traveling. xo

      Like

  35. I used to be terrified of a house fire, too! I always had this dilemma as a child – go and wake up Kati because she’s a super deep sleeper, or go the other direction down the hall and rescue my pet ferrets, because they’re in a cage and can’t get out on their own. Heh heh…sounds kind of funny now, but I really worried about it as a kid. Poor Kati…she might have lost out on that one. I really loved those ferrets… 😉

    Like

  36. Hi Jill. Yes I have had my share of childhood fears. As a child I feared thunderstorms, lightening, wind storms. I used to read a lot of stories of ghosts and fearsome creatures. I developed this fear that a ghost would come and grab me from behind. This fear continued till I grew up. Fear of dark is one such fear that has lingered on even now. I want every corner of my house to be well lit. These are some of my fears. Your account of your fears and how you went running to your parents is so sweet. You must have been a sweet little darling. Thanks for a lovely post and I opologise for coming so late to your post, I will tell you later on what is keeping me occupied. Take care and God bless.

    Like

  37. Hi Samina, I hope all is well and what’s keeping you occupied is something good. I thought about you yesterday, a U.S. Forest Service Officer and his K-9 were shot and killed by a fugitive during a manhunt. It’s such a sad situation. Reading the reports of the relationship between him and his dog is heartbreaking.
    I’m with you on thunderstorms. I was afraid of them as a child and I still don’t like them, especially at night. You’re more brave than me, reading stories about ghosts and scary creatures. I watched Casper the Friendly Ghost and that was it for me. 🙂 I was a big chicken.
    Again, I hope everything is okay. Take care, my friend. xo

    Like

  38. I grew up in Southern California when the Night Stalker was terrorizing people all over. I still check behind the shower curtain and make sure all the windows and doors are locked each night. I probably should stop watching Criminal Minds, but i can’t.

    Like

  39. I was TERRIFIED of sirens when I was a child. (After being told that my mom was taken to the hospital to give birth to me after a tractor caught fire at the dairy barn across the highway from us, I was convinced that was the reason for my fear!) I was also afraid of someone breaking into our house at night….

    Like

    • I can certainly understand why that experience would make you afraid of sirens, Dianna. I don’t remember being afraid of someone breaking in, but that didn’t stop me from peeking under my bed each night. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by, Dianna!

      On Sun, Mar 16, 2014 at 7:56 PM, Jill Weatherholt wrote:

      >

      Like

  40. You have some outstanding commenters here, Jill! Your well written post drew me in, but all the different childhood fears expressed here are very interesting. I was always afraid of going upstairs to my room by myself, in the dark. I was the only girl, so usually my brothers would come up together. I was afraid of the dark and what it held! I guess somewhere along the way in my life, I did get more courage and now, have lived for the longest time ever, alone… for 8 years. Thanks for this thought provoking post, Jill! Smiles, Robn

    Like

    • Thanks, Robin! I so enjoyed reading about everyone’s childhood fears. I appreciate you stopping by and adding the to conversation. I remember also being afraid to go upstairs to my room, after dark. I didn’t have any brothers, so I was on my own. 🙂
      I remember when I first moved out on my own, after college, I never read Stephen King again. 🙂
      Have a great week, Robin!

      Like

      • I wanted to go back and comment that your parents sound very kind and understanding about your fears. I loved it when I curled up with my parents, on rare occasion when I was having a nightmare. We were lucky, Jill! Hope you have a great rest of the week and weekend, too!

        Like

      • My parents were and still are great! Both my mom and my dad have been my rock, as a child and as an adult.
        We were lucky, Robin!

        Like

  41. As a child I can imagine how scared you must have been I had a vivid imagination and had to leap into my bed in fear of something evil under the bed grabbing my feet…..mmmm might be a picture book in that one, Im sitting here trying to imagine what my monster under the bed looked like. A cross between the big bad wolf and a monster from where the wild things are.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s